E-mail: nursing2017@scientificfuture.com | USA : +1-646-828-7579, UK : +44-203-695-1242 | April 05-07, 2017, Barcelona, Spain  

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Keynote Speaker

Cheryl Dellasega
Penn State College of Medicine USA
Title: The Relational Nurse

Biography: Cheryl Dellasega, NP, PhD, is a relational aggression expert, and the author of six books on issues affecting women: When Nurses Hurt Nurses, Forced to be Family, Mean Girls Grown Up, The Starving Family, Girl Wars, and Surviving Ophelia. Dr. Dellasega’s writing and teaching offer essential insights into the different conflicts that arise in female-to-female relationships. As the founder of Club and Camp Ophelia™ (www.clubophelia.com) she has helped thousands of girls confront and overcome relational aggression. Her expertise in the world of girls has led to frequent requests for her training workshops for teachers, therapists, and other adults who work with young women. In addition, she speaks to adult women who confront relational aggression at home, in the workplace, and/or within the community. As a Professor of Humanities in the College of Medicine, Executive Coordinator of Nursing Work Environments, and Director of the Qualitative Research Institute, Dr. Dellasega is actively involved in nursing practice and medical education (teaching, research, and leadership). She also conducts research on psychosocial issues, and leads community outreach efforts. She is an international expert on family relationships and completed a visiting professorship in Sweden. Dr. Dellasega’s work with girls has led to several accolades: The Mae Carvel Award (2003), AAUW Woman of the Year Award (Harrisburg, PA chapter) (2003), and, in 2004, The Penn State University Outreach Award. She has also been named a Distinguished Alumni of Millersville University (1992) and Vestal Central High School (2011). Appearances She has appeared as an expert on national and local television and radio shows and in print to discuss breaking news items and the every day challenges facing women today. Here follows a sampling of her media experience.

Abstract: Aim of the study/ Purpose: This presentation explores concepts discussed in two books published by Sigma Theta Tau, the International Nursing Honor Society (When Nurses Hurt Nurses and Toxic Nursing, a 2013 AJN Book Awardee). The goal of both books was to explore the phenomena of Relational Aggression (RA), a form of female bullying that has also been described as lateral or horizontal violence. Research questions included: What forms of RA do nurses experience in their work environments? Why is RA prevalent in the “caring” profession? How can we intervene to create a more positive environment for all nurses? Introduction in brief: “Nurses eat their young” is a dated expression, and yet it captures a dynamic that continues in many nursing units around the world. While nurses are highly trusted by patients, they often aggress against each other with words and behaviour that covertly hurt and undermine. A study by Dellasega et al discovered that many nurses witness RA in their work environment, watching helplessly as their colleagues are berated and unappreciated. RA can occur at any level of nursing and between any professions connected to nursing; it has been associated with burnout and somatic health issues. Procedures/ Methods: For the purposes of creating two books that would serve as resources for nurses, anecdotal information from workshops and emails was used. In addition, a systematic review of online postings about nursing conflicts was conducted and a thematic analysis of results conducted. In addition, a survey of physicians and nurses was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of Organizational Cynicism, RA, and Institutional Commitment in a large academic medical center. Results: Relationship issues threaten the viability of the nursing profession at multiple levels. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses support the detrimental impact of RA on the nursing work environment. Conclusion: To address these issues, a program called The Relational Nurse Coach has been developed and is in the process of being implemented and evaluated. Preliminary data will be shared.


Keynote Speaker

Rose E. Constantino
University of Pittsburgh, USA
Title: Creating safe environments through effective communication

Biography: Rose E. Constantino, PhD, JD, RN, FAAN, FACFE, is an Associate Professor and Fulbright Scholar at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Department of Health and Community Systems. She teaches Forensic Nursing based on the content of a book she co-edited “Forensic Nursing: Evidence-based Principles and Practice published by F. A. Davis in 2013. Her pro bono family law practice representing vulnerable clients in court is founded on her research on the consequences of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) on the physical and mental health and social justice, safety and well-being of women, men and children worldwide. Her current research is in evaluating the effectiveness of Online and Mobile delivery of health interventions to survivors of IPV as a disruptive innovation: Health, Education, and Legal Promotion plus Physical Activity (HELP+AP) in building healthy relationships and preventing or repeating IPV. She is the 2016 recipient of the ANA Jessie M. Scott Award for excellence in integrating nursing research, practice and education, a 2016-2017 STTI Mentor for the Gerontological Nursing Leadership Academy and a 2016 Fulbright Scholar

Abstract: Communication is the essence of health, healthcare providers and is the crux of the nurse-patient relationship. The purpose of this paper is to provide information and guidance for audiences to shift toward communication paradigms that transform safe environments. Clear and effective communication also transforms sympathy into empathy by listening for cues, asking open and directive questions, seeking clarification about feelings, using pauses and silences, exploring cues, using tender prompts and nudges, screening, reflecting, clarifying and summarizing. Examples will be provided during the interactive presentation. Emphasis will be placed on a global paradigm shift (GPS) in communication. GPS in communication is defined as a fundamental change in our communication strategy that affects not only the patient but reverberates to his/her ecological domains: family, interpersonal, community, society and globally. Effective communication can be defined as a process or an event during which information is shared through the exchange of verbal, nonverbal, virtual and electronic messages and where relationships are built and rebuilt to form the foundation of a safe and healthy environment. GPS in communication occurs when usual and accepted ways of communicating our thoughts, feelings, actions and beliefs about health and healthcare strategies change. To remain relevant in this rapidly changing and shrinking technology-driven world of ours, we need to be innovative by shifting our communication strategies that transforms communication barriers (environment, vulnerability, fear, anxiety, poverty of thought, ideas and skills) into opportunities that meet the demands of diverse global healthcare consumers. The outcomes of effective communication are CARE: Collaboration, Agility, Resilience, and Ethical practice that strengthen the bond between healthcare consumers and healthcare providers globally


Nursing and Healthcare Education & Research

Session Introduction

Heather MacDonald
University of New Brunswick, Canada
Title: Getting back in the game: Returning to work after a depression

Biography: Heather MacDonald is a Professor at the Faculty of Nursing at the University of New Brunswick. She teaches theory courses and takes students into the clinical setting. She teaches in the undergraduate and graduate programs. Professor MacDonald completed a Bachelor of Nursing at the University of New Brunswick, a Masters of Science in Nursing at the University of Toronto and a PHD at the University of Manchester(UK). Her research is focused in two areas: Women and Depression and Respite Care for parents of children who require complex care. Professor MacDonald has published her work in scholarly journals and she has presented her work extensively to international audiences.

Abstract: In this grounded theory study 40 English speaking women from a rural province of Canada were interviewed to learn about their experiences of returning to work after a depression. Women described getting back in the game as being difficult and challenging as they had not completely recovered by the time they returned to work. However, they felt compelled to return to work in order to keep their jobs, in order to resume health and social benefits, and to reinstate their wages. A number of themes emerged from the interview data. These included the presence of stigma, the active pursuit of silence, and battling adversity. Each of these core themes serves to describe the women’s experiences of returning to work. The women described wearing a mask or “putting on a face” to combat the stigma associated with their illness. In this presentation the three themes will be discussed along with a thorough description of wearing a mask. Strategies that employers can employ to ease the transition back to work will be discussed.


Robie Victoria Hughes
Scott Air Force Base, USA
Title: Impact of Nursing Leadership on Outcomes: A Review

Biography: Dr. Vickie Hughes has serviced in various clinical, educational, and leadership positions over the last 30 years. Her mental health clinical background has been working with children, adolescents, adults and families in inpatient, partial hospitalization, and outpatient programs. She obtained the Adult Psychiatric/Mental Health CNS certification in 1996 and was recognized as a Certified Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor in 1998. She has 9 years of teaching and course development experience to include serving as a Dean for an Associate Degree Health Science program. She has served in leadership positions as a director of nursing and a clinic CEO.

Abstract: Purpose: To review the literature to examine nurse leadership styles associated with positive impact on nurse and patient care outcomes Design: Review of the literature published between July 2006 and July 2016 to answer the following question: What is the impact of nurse leadership styles on nurse quality of work environment and patient outcomes? Methods: PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were searched using the search terms “nurse leadership impact”. Twenty-four papers were selected that met inclusion criteria. Results: Ten nursing leadership styles were identified during the review. The ten styles could be classified as relationship focused, task focused, and values (morality) focused. The impact of leadership was reported on over 30 patient outcome variables, such as patient safety, infection rate, mortality, patient satisfaction, treatment complications and re-hospitalization. Furthermore, specific nursing leadership strategies demonstrated an impact on nurse morale, retention, and motivation. Conclusions: Nursing leadership does impact patient care outcomes and nursing staff’s quality of life. Developing effective nurse leaders is important for the future development of healthcare services. Strategies to promote effective nurse leadership is an area needing further research. Clinical Relevance: Skills needed to prepare nurse leaders might be different than those of other career fields due to the importance of clinical competence. Identifying specific nurse leadership skills for clinical and administrative departments may lead to improved patient and nurse outcomes.


Alison Burton Shepherd
Vocare Group, UK
Title: The Hand in Hand Nature of Nutrition and Cognitive Decline

Biography: MRS Alison Burton Shepherd is a Senior Lecturer in Adult Nursing at De Montfort University Leicester UK. In 2010 she became a Queens Nurse, which is an award given for excellence in Nursing Care within the Community Setting. She works as an Advanced Nurse Practitioner and is an Independent Nurse Prescriber. Mrs Burton-Shepherd is also a specialist Nurse advisor for the care quality commission.

Abstract: It is well documented that Nutrition affects the brain throughout life, with profound implications for cognitive decline and dementia. According to the Office of National Statistics (2016) Dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease accounted for 11.6% of all recorded deaths in the UK during 2015. The death rate from dementia was double in woman at 41,283 deaths when compared to males where the death rate was 20,403. However whilst dementia has overtaken heart disease as the leading cause of death in the UK it is still pertinent to note that heart disease remained the leading cause of death in men in 2015. Therefore it is prudent to suggest that preventing or postponing the onset of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) by delaying or slowing its progression would lead to a consequent improvement of health status and quality of life in older age. In particular, (Shepherd 2011) argues that nutrients (food and/or supplements) such as vitamins, trace minerals and lipids can affect the risk of cognitive decline and dementia, especially in frail elderly people at risk of deficiencies. The objective of this presentation is to review data relating diet to risk of cognitive decline and dementia.


Karen F Phillips
William Paterson University, USA
Title: Models of clinical education and student satisfaction with the clinical learning environment: An integrative review of the literature

Biography: Karen F Phillips is an Associate Professor of Nursing at William Paterson University, New Jersey, USA. She is a registered nurse with a Masters in Nursing and a Doctorate in Education. Dr. Phillips is an experienced clinician and educator with forty years of experience, primarily in Obstetrics. Dr. Phillips is a International Board Certified Lactation Consultant certified through the International Board of Lactation Consultants Examiners. Dr. Phillips has published several articles and presented at the local, national and international levels. Research areas includes interventions to improve breastfeeding rates and strategies that facilitate student learning.

Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This review focuses upon a gap that has been identified in the literature related to clinical nursing education. One objective of this work is to provide for the reader an integrative review of the existing literature on clinical nursing education and student satisfaction. Introduction: Nursing programs have been challenged to hire and retain qualified nursing faculty. This shortage of nursing faculty directly impacts the clinical learning environment. The clinical experience is a crucial aspect of learning nursing practice which enables students to connect theoretical and conceptual knowledge. Several models are currently being utilized by nursing programs to improve the quality of the clinical learning environment such as Collaborative Learning Units (CLU), Dedicated Education Units (DEU), Preceptorship, School-Clinical Agency Partnerships, Faculty Supervised Practicum, and Joint Hospital University Appointments. Procedures/Methods: A literature search focusing on studies published between 2002 and 2015 was conducted from 5 electronic databases. Thirty-five articles were reviewed and 22 were selected for this literature review. This literature review examined student satisfaction in the clinical learning environment using articles employing the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) and examining the use of alternate clinical staffing models as well as differing levels of undergraduate nursing students. Results: The studies reviewed concluded that students favored a more positive and favorable clinical environment than they perceived as being actually present and a supportive clinical learning environment is of paramount important in securing positive teaching learning outcomes. Conclusion: Nurse educators can apply these results to develop and maintain quality clinical teaching and promote a positive, student-centered, clinical learning environment.


Lizy Mathew
William Paterson University, USA
Title: Models of clinical education and student satisfaction with the clinical learning environment: An integrative review of the literature

Biography: Lizy Mathew is an Associate Professor of Nursing at the William Paterson University of New Jersey, USA. She is a registered nurse and hold a Masters in Nursing and a Doctorate in Education. Dr. Mathew is an experienced clinician and educator with over twenty six years of experience. In addition, Dr. Mathew is board certified as an Adult Nurse Practitioner by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Dr. Mathew published many articles and presented at the local, national and international levels. Her research focuses on improving undergraduate nursing curriculum.

Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This review focuses upon a gap that has been identified in the literature related to clinical nursing education. One objective of this work is to provide for the reader an integrative review of the existing literature on clinical nursing education and student satisfaction. Introduction: Nursing programs have been challenged to hire and retain qualified nursing faculty. This shortage of nursing faculty directly impacts the clinical learning environment. The clinical experience is a crucial aspect of learning nursing practice which enables students to connect theoretical and conceptual knowledge. Several models are currently being utilized by nursing programs to improve the quality of the clinical learning environment such as Collaborative Learning Units (CLU), Dedicated Education Units (DEU), Preceptorship, School-Clinical Agency Partnerships, Faculty Supervised Practicum, and Joint Hospital University Appointments. Procedures/Methods: A literature search focusing on studies published between 2002 and 2015 was conducted from 5 electronic databases. Thirty-five articles were reviewed and 22 were selected for this literature review. This literature review examined student satisfaction in the clinical learning environment using articles employing the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) and examining the use of alternate clinical staffing models as well as differing levels of undergraduate nursing students. Results: The studies reviewed concluded that students favored a more positive and favorable clinical environment than they perceived as being actually present and a supportive clinical learning environment is of paramount important in securing positive teaching learning outcomes. Conclusion: Nurse educators can apply these results to develop and maintain quality clinical teaching and promote a positive, student-centered, clinical learning environment.


Gjyn O’Toole
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Title: Family /Person-centred Care: Reducing costs & increasing positive outcomes

Biography: Gjyn O’Toole, as an Occupational Therapist and trained educator has enjoyed empowering people to overcome emotional; physical; cognitive and social barriers in order to live their life with positive self-esteeem; purpose and meaning. She has worked globally and published in various areas to improve the quality of health care. Person/patient/Family-centred practice is a passion of hers, not only because it improves health care outcomes, but also because it enhances satisfaction for all stakeholders. This has meant she reseached, developed and published a model to encourage practitioners to achieve Person/Family -centred care. She currently teaches health professionals at The University of Newcastle, Australia.

Abstract: Aim of the study: This study aimed to identify the significance of Family/Person-centred practice in health care and the characteristics of such practice, in order to increase satisfaction for all health care stakeholders (including employers and policy-makers). Introduction in brief: Governments around world have begun using the term Family/Patient/Person-centred Practice (F/P-cP) when creating policies and guideline for health care. This term suggests a focus other than the medical model driven by doctors or nurses. Discussion began about what this might mean in everyday practice and how to achieve such practice. This discussion and exploration of the requirements of such practice produced a model of F/P-cP. This model has been used to educate and guide health professionals to achieve F/P-cP in their health care. Exploring ways to implement the model in health care practice is an ongoing task at The University of Newcastle, Australia. Procedures/ Methods: Development of the model occurred after an extensive review of relevant literature and a qualitative pilot study exploring F/P-cP amongst Occupational Therapists in Australia, using convenience sampling and thematic analysis with member checking and consensus coding. Results: The results led to the creation of a model of F/P-cP. The model highlights the importance of mutual understanding and the therapeutic relationship as two important steps in achieving F/P-cP and goals. Conclusion: The model identifies elements of effective F/P-cP, indicating a combination of these elements to produce positive outcomes for all stakeholders in health care practice including the Families/Persons, the health professional, the employers and the policy-makers. Acknowledgments: I would like to thank Carlien Badenhorst for conducting the qualitative study exploring elements of the model of Family/Person-centred Practice. Discussion of this model can be found in an Elsevier publication by Gjyn O’Toole.


Samira Obeid
The Max Stern Yezreel Valley College, Israel
Title: Perceptions of public health nurses on health promotion intervention for healthy lifestyle

Biography: Dr. Obid, a native Arab, was born and raised in the Galilee village of Kafer-Yaseef. She received her Ph.D. (2012) and MPH (2005) in public health from Haifa University specializing in Health Promotion. She obtained her first degree, BSc in Nursing, from Hadassah School of Nursing at The Hebrew University. Between 1988 and 2000, she worked at Carmel Hospital in Haifa as a deputy and later head nurse of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. In the year 2000, Dr Obid worked as a head nurse of community primary clinics of Clalit Health Services. As a community nurse she coordinated and instructed several projects including promoting prevention of diabetes, high blood pressure, heart failure among patients and home accidents at the provincial level. Since 2008, Dr Obid is working as head of the health promotion department in the North Region Office of the Ministry of Health. As a health promoter she initiated, executed and evaluated health promotion projects in many topics including smoking among the Arab community, healthy life style focused on nutrition and physical activity, preventing home accident in the Arab community and promoting the diagnoses and quality treatment of Arab Dementia elderly patients. Through her job she accompanied and counselled several public and professional organisations and local municipalities on issues related to health promotion like; healthy cities, healthy schools, and the pilot of the National Program for healthy life style. Her research (MPH and PhD) focused on healthy and unhealthy behaviours, the social determents and the social capital of the Arab community. Areas of interest for postdoc research: 1. Social capital determents in minorities and health behaviors and indicators. 2. Planning, operation and evaluation of health promotion programs among several target groups. 3. Cultural adaptation for minorities.

Abstract: Aim of the study: This research aimed to assess the perceptions and opinions of the public health nurses (PHN) on health promotion empowerment intervention for healthy lifestyle among nurses. Introduction: The World Health Organization predicts that by the year 2020 two-thirds of all disease burdens worldwide will be the consequence of inappropriate lifestyle choices. Although, interventions to prevent diseases related to such behaviours on a population-wide basis and individual health-care interventions are not only achievable but also cost effective. Public health nurses (PHN) play important roles in health promotion and disease prevention and control at the community and population levels. Methods: Intervention: Twelve empowerment seminars on the topic of health promotion and healthy lifestyle were held from 2012 to 2014 for all of the nurses (340) working in the governmental mother-child health care clinics (MCHC). The current research assessed perceptions, barriers and opinions of public health nurses (PHN), participated in the seminars, and their role as agent for change in health promotion interventions. . Deep interviews with a purposeful sampling of 165 PHNs were held. Data was analysed with content analysis. Results: The seminars improved and refreshed the knowledge of the nurses and provided them with tools and skills to deal with health promotion practices. PHNs reported on changing personal health behaviours. Most of the nurses reported that they felt confident to counsel their clients in issues related to healthy lifestyle and to initiate and activate health promotion programs. In addition it revealed the main barriers with respect to behavioural change and implementation of health promotion programs including laziness, lack of time, fatigue and work load. The nurses reported positive attitudes toward the program; they felt empowered and had the capacity to deal with health promotion practices. Conclusion: health promotion intervention (nutrition and physical activity) for PHNs can be effective in promoting healthy life style among nurses. Acknowledgments Authors acknowledge that this research was not supported by any person, or funding agency.


Jared Dougherty
Penn State Hershey Medical Center, USA
Title: Nurses and Relational Challenges in the Critical Care Unit

Biography: After graduation from York College of Pennsylvania in May 2014, Jared M. Dougherty became a clinical nurse in the Heart and Vascular Institute Critical Care Unit at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania. He is trained in caring for patients requiring advanced heart failure therapies including mechanical circulatory support devices and cardiac transplantation. Mr. Dougherty is currently enrolled in a dual Master of Science in Nursing-Master in Business Administration program at The University of Texas at Tyler. He has obtained CCRN certification from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses and was recognized as an expert clinician, Clinical Nurse IV, on the professional clinical ladder at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. In addition to his time as a clinical nurse, Mr. Dougherty is the chair of the Department of Nursing Quality of Work Life shared governance council. In collaboration with hospital administration, Mr. Dougherty and council representatives focus on staffing, scheduling, recruitment, and retention efforts of clinical nurses within the 500+ bed academic medical center. In an attempt to improve interdisciplinary communications, Mr. Dougherty has partnered with Dr. Cheryl Dellasega to create a structured program for nurses to support one another and combat issues such as relational aggression and compassion fatigue. These efforts have been formally implemented as the Relational Nurse Champion Program™ in a four unit trial period.

Abstract: In the critical care unit, special challenges confront the registered nurse. Burnout syndrome (BOS), which is connected with negative physical and psychological outcomes and can impact patient care delivery, afflicts one third of nurses (Poncet et al., 2007). As well, Cox (2001) discovered that nursing job satisfaction decreases with high technology and an uncertain and variable work environment. Conflict with other nurses is also associated with lower job satisfaction. While there are physical factors influencing the critical care work environment (most notably, noise and constrained space), many of these stressors have a relational component. In the critical care unit, interactions with other nurses and team members are not only more frequent but often quicker and of a more urgent nature. Patient acuity is higher and nurses are at the forefront of dealing with distressed friends and family. Nurses in general report a high degree of difficulty confronting and coping with relational difficulties; critical care nurses are often “young” in their careers and have little preparation for or experience with managing work-related conflicts. As a consequence, relationship issues such as miscommunication, conflict, moral distress and burnout occur. According to Elpern, Covert, and Kleinpell (2005), critical care nurses report the highest levels of distress with the provision of aggressive care to patients not expected to benefit from that care. Elpern, Covert, and Kleinpell (2005) also found that moral distress adversely affects job satisfaction, retention, psychological and physical well-being, self-image, and spirituality. Few studies have examined interventions which can address relational issues in the critical care unit; however, Choe, Kang, and Park (2015) have discovered that critical care nurses are at a greater risk for developing moral distress than their medical surgical nurse colleagues. We are currently implementing The Relational Nurse Champion Program™ in two critical care units at our medical center to address relational challenges nurses confront in their work life. This program uses select nurse champions trained in the Educate, Relate, and Integrate model of relationship building. Strategies for clear and effective communication, stress management, morale building and role modeling, professional relationship development, and environmental alternatives will be used to help staff nurses create a more positive and fulfilling work environment within critical care and other settings.


Belal Mahmoud Hijji
Alghad International Colleges of Applied Medical Sciences, Kingdom of Saudid Arabia
Title: Frequency of item writing flaws in teacher-constructed multiple-choice questions used in nursing examinations at three Middle Eastern universities' faculties of nursing: A descriptive quantitative study

Biography: Dr. Hijji has completed his Bachelor of Nursing degree from Yarmouk University, Jordan 1983-1987; MSc in Nursing Studies from the University of Manchester, UK.1999-2001 and Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Ulster, UK. 2003-2007. Currently he is working as Assistant Professor of Nursing, Department of Nursing, Alghad International Colleges for Applied Medical Sciences, Najran, KSA. Between 2008 & 2015, he has also worked as an assistant professor at the Faculty of Nursing, University of Benghazi, Libya, Faculty of Nursing, University of Hail, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Faculty of Nursing, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine, Faculty of Nursing, Philadelphia University/ Jordan. He is a member of Jordan Nurses and Midwives Council; The International Scientific Advisory Panel (ISAP) of the Royal College of Nursing, UK. His research work focuses on clinical practice and nursing education. Dr. Hijji has conducted a pioneer study on the quality of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) that was the first at the level of basic and higher education in the Arab world. His paper was accepted for publication in the Journal of Nursing Education.

Abstract: Abstract: Aim of the study/ Purpose: The aim of this pilot study was to critically appraise the structure of a convenience sample of teacher-constructed multiple-choice question (MCQs) included in nursing examinations at three universities in the Middle East (ME). The objectives of the study were to: 1. find out whether the educators adhered to MCQ construction principles; 2. identify the number of flaws that affected each question, if any. Introduction in brief: In many Middle Eastern universities, English is the medium of instruction and testing. As nursing educators construct MCQs, it is essential that test items are developed to be valid and reliable in order to assess student learning. Procedures/ Methods: This pilot study examined the structure of 98 MCQs included in nursing examinations at three ME universities, using a checklist composed of 22 literature-based principles. Results: Ninety MCQs (91.8%) suffered one or more item writing flaws (IWFs). Examples of IWFs included: linguistic errors, various problems with the stem and answer options to include the use of "all of the above". Of importance, most faculty did not use item analysis to assess the integrity of the examinations. Conclusion: Results confirm concerns about the standards faculty use for test construction and item analysis. Universities must ensure that faculty they hired are fluent in English. Faculty would also benefit from workshops that focus on test construction and the use of item analysis. Acknowledgment: The author is immensely grateful to Professor Kader Parahoo and Dr. Marrie Tarrant for critically reading the manuscript. Many thanks to Dr. Wesam Taher Al Magharbeh, Dr. Jed Castillo Tolentino, and Mrs. Rania Suleiman Al Sabe' for reviewing the questions.


Salwa Obeisat
Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan
Title: Violence against infertile women: prevalence and risk factors

Biography: Associate professor in the Maternal and Child Health Department at the Faculty of Nursing, Jordan University of Science and Technology. Dr. Obeisat obtained her Doctorate in Nursing Science from the Catholic University of America in 1999. Dr. Obeisat was the dean of nursing at the Hashemite University in Jordan, between the year 2003 and 2006. Her research publications in the area of women's health and infertility,. Dr. Obeisat served as a temporary consultant for national and international organizations including WHO, Jordanian Nursing Council, and Higher Population Council. Dr. Obeisat is currently a member of several university committees

Abstract: Aim of the study/ Purpose: to investigate the prevalence and types of violence against infertile women, and determines the risk factors for violence against infertile women. Research questions: 1. What is the prevalence and forms of violence against infertile women in Jordan? 2. What are the significant predictors of violence against Jordanian infertile women? Introduction in brief: Violence has been occurring in almost all countries in the world throughout human history. Infertility is an important factor that affects the harmony of couple’s life, including; decreasing in marital life satisfaction, increasing stressors, where they all lead to violence against women. Procedures/ Methods: A cross sectional design was used; a convenient sample of 170 infertile women was recruited from the infertility and reproductive health centre at King Abdullah University Hospital [KAUH] in Irbid. The violence against infertile women scale was adopted from the Arabic version of marital abuse scale and modified to fit the infertility women was used to collect data, in addition to a socio-demographic questioner which was developed by the researcher. Descriptive statistics and inferential analyses were used such as one way ANOVA test, q-square test, and logistic regression analysis. Results: Results showed that 65.9% was the prevalence of violence against infertile women, and the psychological violence was the most common type. The risk factors associated with violence were women educational level, husband occupation, marriage duration, type of marriage, infertility duration, and husband drinking alcohol. While women occupation, marriage years, type of marriage, infertility years, and infertility type were the best predictors of violence. Conclusion: The results of this study provide baseline information about the socio-demographic factors associated with violence against Jordanian infertile women that can be used to plan and implement a national based program for violence screening to enhance the quality of life of Jordanian infertile women.


Magfiret KASIKCI
Atatürk University, Turkey
Title: Knowledge of nurses working in the state hospitals regarding nursing process and factors affecting using of nursing process

Biography: Mağfiret Kara Kaşıkçı obtained her PhD from University of İstanbul. Currently is a professor at the Faculty of Nursing University of Atatürk. Her research interests include care of chronic illness, nursing education, nursing ethics and nursing theories. Dr. K.Kaşıkçı has published numerous publications in reputed journals as well as national and international presentations. She is involved in several research projects and a reviewer in many nursing journals.

Abstract: Aim: This descriptive study aims to determine the knowledge of nurses working in a public hospital regarding the nursing process and the factors affecting the use of nursing process. Material-Method: The data of this descriptive study, conducted between May 15, 2013 and January 25, 2016, were obtained from the nurses working in a public hospital between June 16 and 27, 2014. The sample of the study was the same as the study population, and consisted of 95 nurses in this hospital. The research data were collected through face-to-face interview method using the "Interview Form on the Knowledge of Nurses Working in a Public Hospital Regarding the Nursing Process and the Factors Affecting the Use of Nursing Process". In the evaluation of the data, the percentages and frequency test was used. Results: It was found that, almost half (46.7%) of the nurses surveyed was in the 30-36 age group, 43.3% had a 7-13 years of professional experience, the majority (94.4%) was graduated with a Bachelor degree, working mostly in neurosurgery (11.1%) and cardiology (11.1%) clinics, almost all (88.9%) was using the nursing process, and more than half (53.8%) had problems when using the nursing process. It was also found that more than half (59.4%) of the nurses responded to the questions regarding the evaluation of the nursing process correctly, and almost half (45.5%) of them correctly answered the questions on the diagnostic phase. The workload (60.0%) and insufficient equipment (48.9%) were found to be the major factors affecting nurses' inability to use the nursing process. Conclusion: It was determined that nurses' knowledge of nursing process was moderate, and the nursing process was found to be affected by the workload and lack of training on nursing process negatively.


Alina Wiener
Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Israel
Title: Women's intentions to exclusively breastfeed: The Israeli perspective

Biography: Alina Wiener BA, CM, RN is a midwife in Hillel Yaffe Medical Center in Israel. She received her BA from Tel Aviv University and studied midwifery in Rambam Medical center in Haifa. After have being an Application Developer for Microsoft and a stewardess for El-Al airlines, she decided to fulfill her dream to become a midwife. She recently collaborated on a manuscript with friend and colleague, Dr. Merav Ben Natan, entitled Women's intentions to exclusively breastfeed: The Israeli perspective., in which she and Dr. Ben Natan presented research showing factors affecting breastfeeding among Jewish and Arab Muslim mothers and recommendations on a clinical level. She currently resides in Kibbutz Barkai in Israel with her husband Shai and their 4 sons: Tomer, Jonathan, Nittai and Dan. She can be contacted at alina.wnr@gmail.com.

Abstract: Research reveals that there are numerous factors related to women's intention to exclusively breastfeed (EBF). Moreover, several studies do not differentiate between exclusive and partial breastfeeding. The aim of the present study was to identify factors associated with Israeli women's intention to EBF their next baby based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), within the context of Israeli ethnic and cultural diversity. The study is a correlational quantitative study. Women were recruited at lectures on women's health at an urban setting in central Israel during September-December 2013. The lectures were organized by a local nursing school and were open for the general public. A convenience sample of 200 Hebrew-speaking women of childbearing age, who had at least one child over six months old which had been EBF for at least one month. The women completed a closed questionnaire based on the TPB. In the multivariate analysis, behavioral beliefs, behavioral attitudes, knowledge of EBF, and EBF duration of the previous child predicted 35.3% of Israeli women's intentions to EBF in the future. In addition, study findings revealed the importance that women attributed to their spouses' opinion concerning EBF. Muslim Arab women expressed higher intention to EBF than Jewish women. The findings of this study will constitute the basis of a nurse-administered intervention program for promoting EBF in Israeli society. In the context of this program, nurses’ interventions will emphasize the benefits of EBF for mothers and infants, and provide women and their spouses with tools and information to support EBF. Nurses’ interventions will also take into account the influence of ethnicity and culture, as well as the duration of women’s previous EBF experiences.


Emre Yanikkerem
Celal Bayar University, Turkey
Title: Vaginal douching practice: Frequency, associated factors and relationship with Vulvovaginal symptoms

Biography: Emre Yanikkerem is Associate Professor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing in Manisa Celal Bayar University Faculty of Health Science in Turkey. She completed her Master and Doctorate program at Ege University in Turkey. Her research focuses on violence against women, menopause, sexual health and gynecologic cancer.

Abstract: Aim of the study: To determine the frequency, associated factors and relationship with vulvovaginal symptoms and vaginal douching among Turkish women. Introduction: Vaginal douching for hygiene is affected by individual and cultural characteristics and a widespread practice among women in Turkish culture and in worldwide. Methods: This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in a hospital in Manisa, Turkey and performed from January 2014 to June 2014 with 343 women using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square and Fisher exact test. Results: Of the total 343 women in the study, 91 (26.5%) had reported vaginal douching in the preceding year. Statistically significant relationship was determined between the vaginal douching behaviour and couples who had low education and low income levels, having unplanned pregnancy and had someone in their neighbourhood who douched (p<0.05 each). The most common reason for using vaginal douching was reported to be cleanliness by 85(93.4%) women, prevention of genital infections 75(82.4%), cleaning after/before sexual intercourse 72(79%), during menstruation 49(54%), prevention of vaginal discharge 69(76%), decreasing of unpleasant odours 65(71.4%) and religious beliefs 46(50.5%). Self-reported history of vaginal infection was significantly more common for women who douched compared those who did not (p<0.05). Conclusion: Healthcare providers should determine the reason and risky groups of women and educate the women to stop the vaginal douching behaviour and harmful effects of vaginal douching.


Aysel KARACA
Düzce University, Turkey
Title: Development of a copıng scale for ınfertıle women ın Turkey

Biography: Aysel KARACA has completed his Ph.D (Psychiatric nursing) she worked as an Associate as an director Duzce University Faculty of Nursing. She has been working as infertility psychological consultation in the Turkey. She has published (about infertility) papers and book chapter.

Abstract: Infertility is defined as the inability to become pregnant or maintain a pregnancy despite having intercourse three to four times per week for at least a year. Rather than a medical issue, due to the problems it can cause for individuals and marriages, infertility is seen as a developmental crisis. Aim: This study was planned to develop a culture-specific measurement tool in order to determine coping strategies of women, who undergo an infertility treatment, for the infertility-associated problems. Materials and Methods: Sample was selected by cluster sampling method and the study was carried out in assisted reproduction centers in three big cities (Ankara, Antalya and Istanbul). Sample of the study was composed of 550 women who have admitted to three distinct assisted reproduction centers for in vitro fertilization treatment within a 4-month period. Data were collected by “personal information form” including sociodemographic characteristics, “Coping Scale for Turkish Infertile Women” that has items developed by us and “Stress Coping Styles Scale” to test the reliability of the scale. Cronbach alpha, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient and Spearman’s Rank correlation analyses were used to determine the reliability of the scale. Moreover, correlation analyses were performed by using scale scores that may reveal coping status even if indirectly, in order to determine internal and external validity of the scale. Results: Explanatory factor analysis and factor structure of the scale consisting of 65 items were examined and it was determined that there was a dataset suitable for analysis. It was observed that factor number of the scale was 15. Internal consistency of the scale was found to be high (.924) and it showed a negative, significant correlation with stress coping styles scale (P=.0001). Conclusion: Based on these outcomes, it can be suggested that this developed scale produces valid as well as reliable results. It can be recommended to be used in scientific studies by the researchers.


Bairong Shen
Soochow University, China
Title: Nursing informatics in the era of systems medicine

Biography: Bairong Shen is the Professor and Director of Center for Systems Biology in Soochow University. He received his PhD degree in 1997 and promoted to associate professor in 1999 at Fudan University. Dr. Shen started his research from computational surface chemistry and after 1999, he changed his research to bioinformatics in University of Tampere, Finland, then was recruited as an assistant professor for Bioinformatics there in the beginning of 2004. He joined Soochow University and established a center for systems biology in 2008. His recent researches focus on translational biomedical informatics, biomarker discovery for complex diseases and nursing informatics.

Abstract: Aim of the study/ Purpose: The scientific paradigm for life science is shifting to systems medicine and big-data driven precision medicine. More informatics effort is needed to deal with the heterogeneity of the complex diseases. It is a challenge to efficiently train the cross-discipline graduate students majored in nurse informatics. Introduction in brief: The lacking of clinical phenotype data, especially the paired genotype-phenotype data for the precision understanding of complex diseases, makes the nurse informatics (NI) as one of the key disciplines for the future success of systems medicine, P4 medicine or healthcare and therefore the students majored in nurse informatics with advanced data skills are urgently needed in the market. Procedures/ Methods: By analyzing the gap exists between basic biological researches and the clinical application, we propose the integration of translational biomedical informatics (TBI) to the curriculum for modern NI education, training and researches. We analysed the requirement of skills and knowledge in the nurse informatics field. We designed several ways to train students with different backgrounds and compared the research results of different education modes. Results: A four-step ecological model is developed to train the nursing informatics graduate students. With this model, we trained our student step by step with a problem oriented mode from basic application of knowledge and skills, synthetic and integration of knowledge, to frontiers of nurse informatics researches. We discuss the methods for multiple-mode teaching, the design of co-supervising and the concrete pathway to the successful implementation of the model. Conclusion: Our experience shows that the ecological model is very successful if we team together the students with different backgrounds. Our model can be also extended and applied to other cross-disciplinary education. Acknowledgments This work is supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31670851, 31470821, 91530320).


Filiz SÜZER ÖZKAN
Duzce University, Turkey
Title: Complementary and Alternative Medicine Methods admitted by Infertile Women

Biography: Filiz SÜZER ÖZKAN completed her Doctorate program at Marmara University Faculty of Health Science in Turkey. She received her PhD (Birth and women's health nursing) degree in 2013. Dr. Özkan is an Assistant Professor in Birth and Women's Nursing in the Duzce University Faculty of Health Science in Turkey. She is an experienced clinician and educator with twenty years of experience.

Abstract: Aims and objectives: This study was performed to determine complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) methods that were admitted by infertile women in order to conceive a child. Design: The study had a descriptive and cross-sectional design. Method: The sample of the study was composed of 310 women who admitted to the infertility clinic of a Women and Children's Hospital in a city (İstanbul) in Turkey. Data were collected by a questionnaire form that was prepared based on the literature. Data were assessed by percentage calculation. Results: The ratio of using CAM among the women in the study was 51%. The most commonly used applications were onion (65.1%), fig (45.2%), tail oil (42.9%) and walnut (41.7%). The most commonly known practice was onion (81.9%). It was followed by fig (56. 3%), amulet (34,1%) parsley (30,67%) and pray (30,3%), respectively. Participants stated that only three practices were beneficial. Onion (2 individuals), diet (1 individual) and psychotherapy (1 individual) were the practices which were considered as successful. Conclusions: Half of the women who had a diagnosis of infertility have admitted to CAM methods before or during the treatment at least once. Evidence-based studies about the most commonly known and applied methods are required. For this purpose, it is essential to perform meta-analyses and randomized controlled studies.


Huda Gharaibeh
Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan
Title: Perceived stress and quality of life of working mothers' caring for child with chronic illness

Biography: Huda Gharaibeh is an associate professor in maternal- child health department Jordan University of Science and technology she has earned her Ph.D degree from University of Ulster/UK in 2001 she has done her Master of Nursing Science from Texas Tech University, USA and Bachelor of Science from Jordan University, Amman - Jordan. She has worked as Dean of Princess Salma Faculty of Nursing at Al Al-Bayt University – Jordan and worked as a chairman of maternal- child health department and community health department for more than 10 years at Jordan University of Science and Technology. Her area of interest and research, Quality of life of children and families with chronic illnesses, Prevention and control of genetic and inherited disorders.

Abstract: The purposes of the study: to assess the quality of life of working mothers' caring for child/children with chronic illness compared to non-working, to examine the relationship between mothers' quality of life and disease-related demands and socio-demographic variables, and to assess perceived stress among these women. Introduction in brief: Caring for a child with chronic illness generate extra demands of long-term dependency time and energy on family especially the mothers which may result in feelings of overload or strain for mothers that can reduce their quality of life. Procedures/ Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study design was used during the period of September 2014 to May 2015. A sample of 200 mothers having a child with chronic diseases was approached and 164 mothers agreed to participate. The questionnaires used in this study consisted of three parts: Demographics and socio economic status; Arabic version of World Health Organization Quality of Life WHOQOL-BREF contains a total of 26 questions and Perceived stress Questionnaire. Results: This study revealed that quality of life in the working mothers having a child/ children with chronic illness was significantly lower and stress level was higher than those of not-working mothers on all subscales of HRQOL and perceived stress scale. The overall standard multiple linear regression indicates that 42% of variance in HRQOL was explained stress level, monthly income, number of family members, mothers evaluation of their health, mother work and mother education. Multiple R= 0.66, R Square= 0.44, adjusted R square was 0.42, F (6, 156)= 20.35, P <0.001. Conclusion: The quality of life profile of working mothers of children with chronic illness was lower from those who are not working. Different coping mechanisms and psychosocial programs must be designed and implemented to decrease the burden of care and work. Acknowledgments I would like to acknowledge Jordan University of Science and Technology that approved and support the conduction of this work.


Ola Mamdouh Esheaba
King Saud bin Abdulazizl University, Saudi Arabia
Title: Knowledge, attitude and barriers of using electronic documentation among nurses working in family health centers In Alexandria governorate Egypt.

Biography:

Abstract: Electronic health records are computerized medical information system that collect, store and display patient’s information. The health care systems around the world have a significant rise in the use of electronic health records as an essential tool for improving the safety, quality, efficiency and effectiveness of health care. Nursing informatics system involved in the implementation of new technology in the health care including using the Electronic health records with the aim of enhance services, reduce cost and improve quality of health services. Despite the brood agreement on the benefits of Electronic health records, the health care providers including nurses have moved slowly to adapt these technologies. Several problems were encountered in the adaptation of Electronic health records that are both organizational, behavioral and may be attributed to the Knowledge and attitude of the health care providers toward using of electronic technology. The study aimed to assess Knowledge, attitude and barriers of using electronic documentation among nurses working in family health centers In Alexandria governorate. Egypt. The descriptive cross sectional design was adopted to carry out this study. By using multistage sampling technique eight family health centers were randomly selected. All the nurses working at the selected primary health care centers were recruited to be included in the study with a total of 184 nurses . Three tools were developed and used to collect the data. The mean age of the nurses is 37.4 years , most of them have secondary education and only 5,4% of them have bachelor degree. More than half of them had 10 years to less than 20 years of experience. Only 16.3% of them received training regarding the electronic documentation. More than one tenth of them still use electronic documentation; however, 63.05% of those who don’t use electronic documentation reported lack of resources as a main cause while 27.3% reported lack of training. On the other hand one third of them had no access to computers in their clinics. Regarding benefits of electronic documentation, more than half of them reported that It improved work flow and promote patient care as well as It decease the cost. However, more than half of the nurses had poor Knowledge regarding electronic documentation while 51.1% of them had negative attitude. Regarding the barriers of using electronic documentation, the study reported that individual barriers were reported as the 1st barriers flowed by financial then computer related barriers The study concluded that despite the well-known benefits of using electronic documentation, many barriers were encountered including lack of Knowledge, negative attitude, financial and organizational barriers .we recommended that all efforts should be delivered to overcome the reported barriers with more focusing in nurses Knowledge, training accessibility of computers in order to facilitate the delivery of efficient health care.


Hawazen Rawas
King saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Science, KSA
Title: A Multi-level examination of secondary prevention practices for Saudi people following a recent cardiac event

Biography: Hawazen Rawas has completed her PhD in 2015 from Queensland Univerity of Technology, School of Nursing, Australia. She is assisstant professor at King Saud bin AbdulAziz University for Health Science, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem in Saudi Arabia as well as in other highly developed countries. Notably, 46% of all deaths in Saudi Arabia occur as a result of CVD. The aetiology of CVD within the Saudi population is similar to that of Western countries with atherosclerosis, hypertension, coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus highly prevalent with the main risk factors being smoking, obesity and physical inactivity. While there has been a focus on some of the risk factors (smoking and obesity) in Saudi Arabia, there is a paucity of research on secondary prevention practices and the health-related behaviours for Saudi people following a recent cardiac event. This study examined the health-related behaviours of Saudi people following a recent cardiac event, and identified the factors that influence these behaviours, using McLeroy et al.’s (1988) Ecological Model of Health Behaviour as a guiding framework. Overall, this study revealed the importance of developing a secondary prevention program for this population. There was a high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases risk factors. The study also revealed the importance of a targeted educational approach and increasing the knowledge and awareness among Saudi cardiac patients in aiming to support behavioural change. The study identified that the knowledge and attitudes of participants were significant factors at an intrapersonal level that influenced their health behaviours. The study also identified that the services and resources in secondary prevention programs for the participants were also significant predictors at the organisational level with regard to developing and maintaining healthy behaviours. The study also identified that factors at interpersonal, community and public policy levels were influenced engagement in health-related behaviours. The present study also confirmed the importance of supportive services in all areas, particularly in areas of physical, emotional and social well-being, to improve patients’ health-related quality of life.


Gülnaz KARATAY
Munzur University School of Health Science, Turkey
Title: Tradıtıonal practıces of women who had breast engorgement problem ın the postnatal perıod

Biography: Dr. Karatay is a associate professor in Public Health Nursing, in the Munzur University Health High School in Turkey. She completed her master and doctorate program at Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Science in Ankara, Turkey. Her academic background and work experience as a Nurse-Researcher has enabled her to develop a range of skills. Accordingly she has been in Prato Hospital in Italy-Florence for 3 months and US-Wisconsin Madison University for 3 months. Her research focuses on motivational interviewing for smoking cessation, improving congnitive function of the elderly, prevention of substance use in adolescent period and women health. Research interest: women health, cognitive health, substance use, adolescence health, smoking cessation

Abstract: Objective: The study aims to assess the traditional practices resorted by mothers to treat breast engorgement. Method: The sample of this descriptive study consisted of 150 mothers who live in the east of Turkey and have 0-1 year old baby. Mothers were selected with the purposive sampling method. Questionnaire developed by researchers was used for data collection. Data obtained using face-to-face interview technique were analyzed in SPSS software using numbers and percentages. Results: Of the mothers, 83.6% stated that they did not receive a breast care consultation before the birth, 69.4% had c-section delivery, 60.0% had breast problems in the postpartum period, and the majority had applied traditional methods to cope with these problems. Among these methods, lansolin pomade was the most frequently used method (24.8%), followed by the excess milk removal by pump or manually (21.9%), applying her own milk on nipples (12.4%), olive oil application (11.4%), warm water application (9.5%), and almond/walnut oil application (5.7%). Conclusion: The majority of the mothers has had breast engorgement problems during the postpartum period, and the majority has applied traditional practices to treat these problems. Although the effects of some of these applications had been reported in the literature, it is not known whether some of them are effective or ineffective yet.


Navarro-Perez CF
University of Vic Central-University of Catalonia, Spain
Title: Reference values for calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation in Colombian children: the FUPRECOL Study

Biography: Navarro-Perez CF. is Faculty of Health Sciences at Manresa, at University of Vic Central-University of Catalonia, Manresa, Spain

Abstract: Aim of the study/ Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish a normal reference range of calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) in Colombia children. Introduction in brief: Actually the demand for the of measurement bone mineral density (BMD) for a Latin-American population has rapidly increased. The measurement of BMD allows to identify children who could be exposed to an increased risk of osteoporosis in adulthood. Procedures/ Methods: A cross-sectional study of 227 children, boys and girls, belonging to the FUPRECOL Study from April to June 2015.Furthermore, height, weight, fat mass percentage and body mass index. Results: In both sexes, the BUA parameter correlated positively with age, weight, height, BMI, and negatively with body fat. Conclusion: For the first time, our results provide sex- and age-specific BUA reference values for Colombian children. A more specific set of reference values is useful for clinicians and researchers and informs clinical practice to monitor bone mineral status.


Zahid, Ranya Abdulaziz
King saud Bin AbdulAziz university, Saudi Arabia
Title: A suggested preventive counselling program to decrease the level of anxiety among the nursing interns in KSA

Biography: Ms. Ranya is a lecturer at King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. She has completed her MA. in Counseling & Clinical Psychology at the age of 25 ,Umm Al- Qura University UQU. She is a PhD candidate. Also She is a supervisor of Student Wellness Center at KSU-HS. She Participated as a speaker in 2 International conferences. She has been chosen as a representitive of creative women in Gulf Countries by Mondelēz International ‘Philadelphia Creativity for a Cause’ Campaign 2015. She is actively involved in many volunteering activities and institutions in her Country. She established (The Academy of languages & Self Development Institute) in KSA.

Abstract: Purpose: This study assess the impact of a preventive psychological counselling program intervention on decreasing the level of anxiety among nursing students starting their Internship program. Introduction: Internship year encompasses a transition of nursing students from highly dependent to a more comprehensive and highly independent practice. Previous studies indicated various feelings of intense concern and anxiety company this phase. Reducing this anxiety through mentorship program and preventative precautionary measure would have a positive impact on students’ performance. Methods: A pre-experimental study included 100 female nursing students starting their internship year during 2015-2016 at university for health sciences in Jeddah. The Anxiety level hierarchy was used in the intervention. A group psychosocial cognitive counselling program was implemented over 3 hours. In the counselling intervention program , psychological techniques are applied to correct irrational thoughts leading to anxiety and stress among students approaching their internship year. Results: Statistically significant differences were found in the anxiety level before and after application of preventive intervention designed for handling students stress and worry. The intervention benefits were contribution to dropping of fears and increasing enthusiasm and motivation to start the internship training. Furthermore, it increased enthusiasm and motivation through identifying wishes and ambitions; obtaining real solutions; facing and challenging own fears; stimulation for the professional process; and increased self-confidence. Conclusion: A preventive psychological counselling intervention session is recommended before starting the internship year. Future studies are needed for follow up in the internship program.


Aysel KARACA
Düzce University, Turkey
Title: Copıng behavıors of ınfertıle women and some assocıated factors

Biography: Aysel KARACA has completed his Ph.D (Psychiatric nursing) she worked as an Associate as an director Duzce University Faculty of Nursing. She has been working as infertility psychological consultation in the Turkey. She has published (about infertility) papers and book chapter.

Abstract: Intoduction: Women generally respond to infertility with deep sorrow and mourning, which can lead to the adoption of emotion-focused coping strategies such as crying, praying, and a belief in God. Aim: This study was performed to determine some sociodemographic factors affecting coping behaviors of women undergoing infertility treatment. Materials and methods: This study was carried out in assisted reproduction centers in two big cities (Ankara and Istanbul) which were chosen by sample clustering method. A total of 550 women who admitted to these centers for in vitro fertilization treatment were included in the sample of the study. Data were collected by personal information form including sociodemographic characteristics, Coping Scale for Infertile Women in Turkey (CSIWT) and Stress Coping Styles Scale (SCSS). Decreases in the total scores in both scales represented problems regarding coping. In statistical analysis, Cronbach alpha coefficient was used for internal consistency. The correlations between education levels, income levels, employment status and the indications for infertility were analyzed by one-way ANOVA model for scale scores; and Tukey test was used to determine significant differences. Moreover, the correlations between the duration of infertility and scale scores were evaluated by Pearson correlation analysis. 0.05 was considered as the level of statistical significance and SPSS (ver. 18) program was used for calculations. Results: Internal consistency level between 30 items of SCSS scale was found to be 0.745. Besides, internal consistency level was found to be 0.744 between the items in self confident approach (SCA) subscale, 0.766 in optimistic approach (OA) subscale, 0.453 in desperate approach (DA) subscale, 0.494 in submissive approach (SA) subscale and 0.366 in seeking social support (SSS)subscale. Total scores from CSIWT and SCSS were found to be significantly higher among the graduates of university compared to the graduates of elementary school. It was detected that total scores from both scales were higher among the ones with a good income level and working women. It was also found that total scores of the scales increased as the duration of infertility increased; but there was not a significant correlation between the indications of infertility and scale scores. Conclusion: Recognition of the factors affecting stress coping among infertile women is highly important for planning psychosocial interventions to decrease their stress levels.


Anne Pingenot
University of Tennessee Chattanooga, USA
Title: Overview of research on technology and nursing

Biography: Bachelor’s degree in nursing from The University of Iowa. Master’s degree in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing from The University of Iowa, USA. Master’s degree in Human Factors Psychology from Kansas State University. PhD in Decision Making Psychology from Kansas State University, USA. Post Doctorate in decision making research at Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland. Experience in clinical nursing (internal medicine, community health and psychiatric nursing), Clinical Nursing Specialist (advance practice), in patient and out-patient nursing and in teaching nursing. Research published in various nursing journals using a variety of methodological approaches to researching problems of interest to nurses. Currently H. Clay Evans Professor in the School of Nursing, teaching and conducting research at the School of Nursing, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Chattanooga, USA.

Abstract: Aim of the study/ Purpose: The purpose of this talk is to overview various research approaches and findings which can benefit nursing educators and managers as well as nurses at the bedside. Introduction in brief: Technology has great promise in the promotion of safety in healthcare, particularly through facilitating communication and decision making. However, many systems have been implemented and policies developed without adequate research to establish best practice. In addition, although we possess the ability to use technology such as simulation for evaluating nursing practice, we have not fully realized its potential for this application. This presentation overviews two studies on the human factors of medication systems, one study on nursing policy on the use of hand-held devices by nurses at the bedside; and one study on the use of standardized simulation scenarios to objectively evaluate nursing performance. The common thread through all these studies is that nursing is under-utilizing technology and failing to influence policy and research into the design of technology for nursing care, especially for communication and decision making. Procedures/ Methods: I propose to present an overview of four research projects, each addressing nursing’s relationship to technology. Each study uses a different methodology and has outcomes specific to the design of that individual study (see references for methodology used in published studies). However, the studies as a group demonstrate how nurses can use research to improve the ability of nurses to use technology to improve the safety and effectiveness of nursing care. Study 1 was a semi-structured interview of inpatient nurses use of a newly installed electronic medication documentation system. Study 2 was a Cognitive Work Analysis of a typical inpatient medication system in an American Hospital at the time of the study, Study 3 was a survey of cell phone use policies for inpatient nursing units in American hospitals. Study 4 demonstrates the use of standardized simulation scenarios to evaluate the performance of nurses. Student nurses and RN nurses who have returned to school for a BSN are participants. In this study, participants individually performed in the nursing role in three emergency department scenarios. The scenarios were counterbalanced in a Latin Square design for presentation to negate order effects on the analysis. Situation Awareness methodology was used to provide objective measures of performance and is used extensively in other professions including some use in medical research. proposing to use these studies as examples of research methods which nursing can and should use to empower nurses to provide safe and effective care. Results: Study 1 demonstrates that we can identify problems in electronic interfaces which, when addressed, can improve the safety and efficiency of medication systems used by nurses. Study 2 demonstrates that re-design of medication systems for better information access, communication and documentation, especially in high stakes situations, can improve the safety and effectiveness of healthcare, Study 3 demonstrates that the design and use of cell phone like hand held devices for nursing use at the bedside has the ability to increase nurse-nurse and nurse-physician communication as well as documentation and information access. Study 4 demonstrates the use of simulation to objectively evaluate performance, whether it is for measuring a student’s performance, educational program effectiveness or for selection of candidates for specific jobs in nursing. Conclusion: Overall, these four studies suggest that nurses are underutilizing technology and can position themselves to influence the development of technology that better meets the professional needs of nurses at the bedside. Acknowledgments No external funding was obtained for any of the studies discussed above. Study 1 co-author was James Shanteau at Kansas State University, PhD. Study 2 Co-authors were James Shanteau at Kansas State University and Daniel Stengstacke of the US Army. Co-authors of study 3 were Diane Katsma, John Brandt and Diane Crayton at California State University, Stanislaus. Co-Authors for study 4 were Lisa Adams and Mary Ann Johnson of California State University, Stanislaus.


Alleene Pingenot
University of Tennessee, USA
Title: Empowering nursing through applied research in technology

Biography: Bachelor’s degree in nursing from The University of Iowa. Master’s degree in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing from The University of Iowa, USA. Master’s degree in Human Factors Psychology from Kansas State University. PhD in Decision Making Psychology from Kansas State University, USA. Post Doctorate in decision making research at Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland. Experience in clinical nursing (internal medicine, community health and psychiatric nursing), Clinical Nursing Specialist (advance practice), in patient and out-patient nursing and in teaching nursing. Research published in various nursing journals using a variety of methodological approaches to researching problems of interest to nurses. Currently H. Clay Evans Professor in the School of Nursing, teaching and conducting research at the School of Nursing, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Chattanooga, USA.

Abstract: Co-author’s details There are various co-authors on the studies I will use to demonstrate methodology. All co-authors are acknowledged in the citations at the end of this abstract along with the references to the studies which have been published to date. For both the Medication Interface and Cognitive Work Analysis studies the research was entirely my own. The co-authors are included because James Shanteau was my major professor and we have worked together subsequently, so he is supervisory. In the Cognitive Work Analysis study, LTC Stengstacke was instrumental in facilitating the study, so is included as third author. The cell phone study was primarily designed and data collection was supervised by me, which is why I am last author (supervisory). The first two authors did the data analysis and wrote it up for publication (with review and input from me). The Situation Awareness study was designed and implemented by me with expertise on scenario content and role playing help from the other two authors, who are listed in order according to their contribution. I did data collection, analysis and write up of the study. Overall, my consistent role when with working with peers is design (methodology), analysis and, usually, write-up, depending on the research abilities of colleagues. Aim of the study/ Purpose: The purpose of this workshop is to discuss specific design methods for research aimed at fitting technology systems to the workflow and cognitive needs of nurses operating those systems. Introduction in brief: Many of the technological systems used by nurses are designed by non-nurses, sometimes with the help of a physician. There are some systems in the UK and Europe which have more healthcare personnel, such as nurses, involved in design. The primary work of design in most cases, however, is accomplished by people with no knowledge of the workflow and process of nursing. This lack of nursing input inevitably results in technological systems which are suboptimal for the support of nursing decision making and nursing process. A Human Resources approach to this issue is to train nursing staff to use the system. A Human Factors approach is to design the system to better fit the needs of the user. This workshop provides an overview of the methodology used to capture nursing knowledge and work flow process so workshop participants can be better prepared to study the fit of technology to the needs of nurses who use technology. Procedures/ Methods: The first half of the workshop will review the design and implantation of studies of nursing problems from surveys, to task analysis, structured interviews, cognitive work analysis and full experimental studies using simulated patient scenarios. During the first half of the workshop, participants will be asked to submit research questions they would like to discuss in the second half of the workshop. In the second half of the workshop, one or two of those submitted questions will be used by the participants with guidance from the workshop presenter to design a research study using one of the methods discussed in the first half. References for further information on specific methods will be provided. Results: When participants complete this workshop, they should have some working knowledge of methodological tools and resources that can help them to address technological problems which affect nursing decision making and nursing process. Conclusion: With these tools, they should be able to study issues in the use of technology and/or the interaction between nurses and technology that can increase the ability of technology to support nurses’ decision making and nursing process. Acknowledgments No external funding was obtained for any of the studies to be discussed. Methodology used for at least four studies will be discussed: Task Analysis with semi-structured interview method: co-author was James Shanteau at Kansas


Jennifer Atteberry
Bemidji State University, USA
Title: Which is better? Identifying the best simulation fidelity for educating nursing students

Biography: Jen is originally from a small rural farming town in Iowa. She is a graduate of the University of Iowa and the University of Phoenix. Jen’s career in nursing has primarily focused on neonatal intensive care nursing. She has been in nursing education since 2004. Currently she is an Assistant Professor at Bemidji State University in Bemidji, MN. Areas of teaching consists of simulation, maternal/newborn, leadership, capstone for senior students, health education, and transcultural nursing. Jen has a strong interest in service learning for students. She has led 17 trips for students at the high school and undergraduate levels in the past 12 years. In her spare time, she enjoys fishing, watching University of Iowa football games, ice hockey, flower gardening, travel, educating people about foster care/adoption, and playing board games with her family.

Abstract: Nursing education uses high fidelity and low fidelity simulation as an interactive teaching method for nursing skills. The active learning process of simulation requires students to process the steps of knowledge acquisition by using psychomotor skills, thus enabling new nursing students to gain basic skills and retain information prior to clinical experiences. The problem research does not address is which simulation fidelity level maximizes psychomotor skill retention and critical thinking. The purpose of this quantitative research is to explore the effect of high and low fidelity simulation on psychomotor skill retention and critical thinking among sophomore baccalaureate nursing students. Creighton’s Simulation Evaluation Instrument is used to collect data for analysis to identify which simulation level is the most appropriate for nursing faculty to work with novice students for psychomotor skill retention and critical thinking. The information demonstrates the benefits of patient interaction as an increase in retention of skills and critical thinking. These findings provide a basis of building simulation into nursing education curriculum, providing interactive learning environments, and promoting students to have quality psychomotor skills and critical thinking in the clinical setting.


Shelley Y. Hawkins
University of Tennessee, USA
Title: Home Telehealth and hospital readmissions in a heart failure population

Biography: Dr. Shelley Y. Hawkins is Professor and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Nursing. She completed a PhD in Nursing Education/Administration, MSN in Adult Health/Nursing Education, and BSN at University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Hawkins is prepared as a family and geriatric nurse practitioner. She completed a post-doctorate fellowship in prevention and management of chronic illnesses focused on using telehealth as a modality to promote self-care of older adults with heart failure and/or diabetes. Dr. Hawkins has extensive administrative and teaching experience with doctoral and master’s nurse practitioner education.

Abstract: Introduction: Technology has been increasingly used to improve the quality of healthcare delivery. Telehealth has the potential to improve symptom detection and potentially reduce readmission rates. Many home care agencies have adopted remote patient monitoring to facilitate early identification of disease exacerbation, especially for patients with chronic diseases such as heart failure. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to quantify the program effectiveness of an existing home telehealth program for heart failure patients specific to the need for program improvement, effectiveness of resource allocation, and determine future strategic planning. Procedures/Methods: Using the Outcome and Information Assessment Set-C (OASIS-C) database, a retrospective analysis was conducted examining 22 months of heart failure patient data from one home care agency in southern California. Seventy patients who received telehealth were compared to patients receiving usual home care nursing services. Results: No major differences in baseline sociodemographic data were found between the two groups. While receiving home healthcare services, the non-telehealth patients had a 21% all-cause readmission rate, compared to the home telehealth patients with a 10% all-cause readmission rate. Statistical differences were found between groups on the variables of smoking, fall risk, vision, shortness of breath, ability to bathe and take oral medications, along with having been discharged from a skilled nursing facility within the last two weeks. Conclusions: Aggregate data analysis is potentially useful in providing insight into the effectiveness of a telehealth-based program. Study findings suggest telehealth programs have the potential to reduce the burden associated with readmissions in the heart failure population.


Lisa M. Koonin
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA
Title: Flu on Call®: A Coordinated Network of Nurse Triage Telephone Lines for Use during a Public Health Emergency

Biography:

Abstract: The impact of a future severe influenza pandemic could be overwhelming to hospital emergency departments, clinics, and medical offices if large numbers of ill people simultaneously seek care. While current U.S. planning guidance to reduce surge on hospitals and other medical facilities during a pandemic largely focuses on improving the ‘‘supply’’ of medical care services, attention on reducing ‘‘demand’’ for such services is needed by better matching patient needs with alternative types and sites of care. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration its partners, has launched an effort called Flu on Call® to be used during an influenza pandemic. The goals for this ongoing effort is to develop a coordinated national network of nurse telephone triage lines for use during a severe pandemic to: 1) improve access to antiviral medications for ill people, 2) provide an alternative to face-to-face provider encounters, 3) reduce medical surge; and 4) increase appropriate use of medical resources. The registered nurses staffing these triage lines will utilize a CDC-approved clinical protocol to assess the health status of callers, help callers determine the most appropriate site for care (e.g., hospital ED, outpatient, home), provide clinical advice, provide patient education, and enable access to antiviral medications for ill people, if appropriate. This innovative project is the first of its kind to create a nationwide nurse triage service for use during a public health emergency. The system is currently under development and has been tested through a series of six simulations conducted from 2013 – 2016 and one live Demonstration Project conducted in two communities in January – February, 2016. Results from these activities will be described and plans for growth and sustainability of the system will be discussed. Utilizing a network of nurse triage lines can be an important tool for assisting the public during a pandemic or other public health emergency by ensuring that sick persons receive prompt clinical advice, directing people to care, if needed, enabling access to life-saving prescription medications, safely managing some ill persons at home, and reducing medical surge on healthcare facilities. Flu on Call® is an excellent way to utilize the many talents and skills of registered nurses during a public health emergency.


Senay Karadag Arli
Agri Ibrahim Cecen University, Turkey
Title: Identification of nursing students’ attitudes toward older people

Biography: Senay Karadag Arli, BSc, MSc, PhD, Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at The University of Agri Ibrahim Cecen. She is an educator of surgical nursing and also interested in holistic nursing in educational and clinical areas. Ayse Berivan Bakan, BSc, MSc, PhD, Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at The University of Agri Ibrahim Cecen. She is an educator of public health nursing and also interested in holistic nursing in educational and clinical areas. Ela Erisik, BSc, MSc, is a PhD student in public health nursing. She is interested in holistic nursing in clinical area.

Abstract: Objectives: The present study aims to identify nursing students’ attitudes toward older people. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted with 166 nursing department students enrolled in a four-year undergraduate program in a university located in Eastern Turkey. The participants were chosen using convenience sampling method, and the data were collected through the Descriptive Characteristics Form and Turkish version of Kogan's Attitudes toward Old People Scale (KAOP). Results: It was found that the students participating in the study had positive attitudes toward older people, and the mean scores of those who wanted to work with older people after graduation were significantly high (p<0.05). Scale mean scores according to receiving Gerontology Nursing course showed that the score difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusions: This study found that nursing students’ attitudes toward older people were positive. Cultural features of the region where the study was conducted are considered to contribute to this result.


Annuo Liu
Anhui Medical University, China
Title: Attentional bias toward emotional stimuli in accidentally injured Chinese patients with different posttraumatic growth levels

Biography: Annuo Liu, Anhui medical university, associate professor, Nursing, PhD, master's tutor. Anhui branch of Chinese medical academy of pediatrics committee member, children's medical association of the first board of directors in Anhui province, etc.

Abstract: Extensive evidence has been obtained that supports an association between an attentional bias toward negative stimuli and vulnerability to stress-related psychopathology. Little is known regarding whether biased attention toward positive stimuli relates to mental health and posttraumatic growth (PTG). The current study investigated whether accidentally injured Chinese patients who had different levels of PTG showed different patterns of attentional bias toward either positive or negative stimuli. A sample of 202 patients completed questionnaires measuring PTG and the modified dot-probe task. Participants were split in three groups based on the 20th percentile on the PTGI-C: high-PTG, medium-PTG and low-PTG. Patients who scored low levels on the PTGI did not exhibit attentional bias toward negative or positive stimuli, patients with medium levels of PTG had difficulty disengaging attention from negative stimuli, and finally, patients with high levels of PTG had difficulty disengaging attention from positive stimuli. An implication of this finding is that the understanding of information processing biases in PTG and therefore suggest a novel target for prevention and treatment interventions, such as attentional bias training addressing stress-related psychopathology.


Francis Sarr
University of The Gambia, West Africa
Title: A proposed methodological approach for assessing the sustainability of expanded programmes on immunisation in developing countries

Biography: Francis Sarr, Associate Professor, is Head of the Department of Nursing & Reproductive Health, School of Medicine & Allied Health Sciences & Acting Dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research, University of The Gambia. In addition to his professional preparation, he was educated at Cuttington University, Liberia (BSc Nursing), the University of Wales, Cardiff (M.Ed, Curriculum Development & Educational Administration), London University School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (MSc & Post-Graduate Diploma, Public Health), London University Institute of Child Health (Nutrition & Child Health Cert.) and London South Bank University (PhD, Public Health concentration). He is a Fellow of the West African College of Nursing. He has published 7 articles in reputed journals and two books on community health education for health professionals.

Abstract: Based on a study [1] assessing the sustainability of the expansion of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) in the Gambia this paper presents a rare policy approach to assessing immunization programmes in developing countries. The methods consist of a stakeholder analysis framework [2], incorporating indicators of financial sustainability of immunization programmes, complemented by a resource map tool and utilization of data from the EPI, government and donor records, and several interview and data collection approaches. The results show that the majority of stakeholders strongly support the use of additional resources for improving the EPI’s infrastructure and funding and, therefore, the sustainability of the EPI, and they would also press for such improvement before any attempt to introduce new vaccines. The results further demonstrate that yearly contribution of each of the actors has been irregular, and generally the contribution of donors remained greater than that of Government; that the nature of decision-making on EPI expenditure varies according to the level at which decisions are made, with, for instance, officials of donors and Government making decisions on the use of EPI resources based on Government policy, prepared projects and budgets; and that , generally, providers are faced with several problems that affect their effectiveness and, therefore, the efficiency of the EPI and providers have many proposals to the problems that they consider the best use of additional resources. The proposed methodological approach can help in transforming at least three main challenges facing researchers, policy makers and practitioners in particularly developing countries: lack of a better understanding of the management and political process involved in the EPI, the flow of resources and expenditures and how they are used within the immunization system, and how to better use limited resources in the immunization system.


Mouhanad Hammami
Global Health Consultants, USA
Title: New media in health promotion and education: Applications for public health

Biography: A graduate of Aleppo University, Syria, Dr. Hammami completed his postdoctoral research in Pediatrics at the Newborn Center of the University of Tennessee in Memphis, and then accepted a faculty appointment at Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Michigan and a research position at the Detroit Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics. In 2006 he was granted the American Medical Association (AMA) foundation for Excellence in Medicine and Leadership award for his public health advocacy and community work. He was awarded the “Health Policy Champion Award” by the Michigan Department of Community Health in 2011, Arab American of the Year in Medicine in 2012 and nominated by the White House for Heroes for Health in 2013. Dr. Hammami served as Executive Director of the National Arab American Medical Association (NAAMA) from 2006 to 2009 and then elected as national president for 2011. He currently serves as the Chief of Health Operations of Wayne County Department of Health and Human Services and County Health Officer for Wayne County where he oversees all health related operations for the 13th largest County in the Nation. Dr. Hammami is responsible for promoting and assuring health and quality of life by providing, maintaining, developing and coordinating a wide-range of innovative and fiscally responsible educational and health services including technology intitatives. Dr. Hammami is a member of several professional and honor societies and has had many publications in various peer reviewed medical journals.

Abstract: In 2013, Internet-enabled new media continue to have enormous potential to revolutionize health education with diverse populations by enhancing our ability to implement evidence-based behavior change strategies in manners that are often far more effective and efficient than were possible in the past. The International Telecommunication Union currently estimates that there are more than 2.3 billion global Internet users; and there are almost 3.5 billion results available when searching for “health” on Google. Social media and information sharing sites, such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, are among the most accessed websites on the Internet with more than 1 billion, 800 million, and 500 million users, respectively. New media applications provide convenient web-based interactive communication tools that may promote dialogue between health educators and e-patients. Participatory medicine may be the most important driving force for new models and experiments in patient-centric practice, cost reform, and medical research. Moreover, the use of social media applications could be better utilized to promote greater interaction between e-patients and health care providers. Integrating social media into health communication campaigns and activities allows health communicators to leverage social dynamics and networks to encourage participation, conversation and community – all of which can help spread key messages and influence health decision making. Social media also helps to reach people when, where and how they want to receive health messages; it improves the availability of content and may influence satisfaction and trust in the health messages delivered. Likewise, tapping into personal networks and presenting information in multiple formats, spaces, and sources helps to make messages more credible and effective. The presentation will explore many of the most popular new media channels available for health education research and practice today, Patient Portals, web based tailored messages, and video games.


Cynthia Willis
Cleveland Clinic Health System, USA
Title: Bridging the practice gap by creating a nurse associate externship program in the journey of life-long learning

Biography: Cynthia J. Willis, DNP, RN, MBA, CMSRN is the Senior Director of Nursing Education and Professional Practice for the Cleveland Clinic Health System. She has been working in the education for over 20 years and is responsible for nursing education for nine of the hospitals in the system.

Abstract: Description/Background There was an identified a new graduate practice gap in clinical skills and patient care management strategies including prioritization, time management, and critical thinking. NPD Practitioners developed a unique 10-week summer program for BSN students entering their senior year to immerse the students in clinical and education endeavor that improve clinical skills and patient care management elements to ease the transition to practice including a year-long student web portal. Actions The Nursing Professional Development Practitioners (NPDP) at a nine-hospital multi-specialty system identified performance gaps in new graduates transitioning from academia to professional clinical practice. The NPDP’s responsible for the onboarding of over 1,000 new graduates annually determined a potential impact opportunity as being the time period between junior and senior year of the BSN program. Externship programs have shown evidence to transform perceptions, values and beliefs for the participants for students in hospital-based programs (Ruth-Shad, Beck, & McCall, 2010). A ten-week nurse associate extern (NAE) program was developed that immersed the participant in a mentored clinical experience, which was supported through five interactive didactic workshops and three unique clinical observations. Workshop content was developed to include activities to develop critical thinking, prioritization, patient care management strategies, and clinical skill enhancement. Each day had a focused theme and content was delivered through simulation, gaming, role-playing, reflection and lecture. Additionally, each day began with small group debriefing sessions facilitated NPDPs to allow the NAEs to share clinical experiences. Outcomes/Takeways Pre and Post program confidence and skill growth were measured. On a four-point scale, confidence in patient interaction and skill performance improved from 1.61 to 3.35 points and multiple clinical skills were performed the first time in the program. 16 of the 30 participants are now onboarding as registered nurses. Description A ten-week nurse associate extern program was developed that immersed the senior BSN student in a mentored clinical experience and interactive didactic workshops and clinical observations, which was supported through five interactive didactic workshops and three unique clinical observations


Xiaohong Liu
Second Military Medical University, China
Title: Attentional bias toward emotional stimuli in accidentally injured Chinese patients with different posttraumatic growth levels

Biography: Xiaohong Liu, the second military medical university professor, a supervisor of doctoral students, the domestic first to cultivate nursing psychology master's, PhD, postdoctoral, a total of 37 (22 postdoctoral, 1 doctor, 14 master).

Abstract: Extensive evidence has been obtained that supports an association between an attentional bias toward negative stimuli and vulnerability to stress-related psychopathology. Little is known regarding whether biased attention toward positive stimuli relates to mental health and posttraumatic growth (PTG). The current study investigated whether accidentally injured Chinese patients who had different levels of PTG showed different patterns of attentional bias toward either positive or negative stimuli. A sample of 202 patients completed questionnaires measuring PTG and the modified dot-probe task. Participants were split in three groups based on the 20th percentile on the PTGI-C: high-PTG, medium-PTG and low-PTG. Patients who scored low levels on the PTGI did not exhibit attentional bias toward negative or positive stimuli, patients with medium levels of PTG had difficulty disengaging attention from negative stimuli, and finally, patients with high levels of PTG had difficulty disengaging attention from positive stimuli. An implication of this finding is that the understanding of information processing biases in PTG and therefore suggest a novel target for prevention and treatment interventions, such as attentional bias training addressing stress-related psychopathology.


Wilhelmina Hendrika ten Ham-Baloyi
Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa
Title: The Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) of midwives with regard to Kangaroo Mother Care

Biography: Wilma ten Ham-Baloyi completed a Bachelor of Nursing degree from the Christian College of Higher Education in Ede in The Netherlands, a masters and doctorate in Community Nursing at the North-West University, Potchefstroom and an advanced diploma in the education at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. She is currently a fulltime postdoctoral fellow and part-time lecturer at the Department of Nursing Sciences at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. Her postdoctoral research project aims to develop an educational strategy for midwives with regard to clinical decision making in Kangaroo Mother Care.

Abstract: Background: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) is recommended as a key interventions by the South African Department of Health in order to meet the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) for maternal, new-born and child survival. The concept has not been always implemented successfully. The researcher experienced a lack of education and training for healthcare professionals, including midwives with regards to KMC, therefore a need for the development and implementation of an educational strategy for healthcare professionals for reinforcement and implementation of KMC practices. A questionnaire regarding the midwives’ overall knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) was conducted to inform the educational strategy. Aim: To explore and describe the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) of midwives with regard to Kangaroo Mother Care. Methods/ Design: A quantitative descriptive method design was used. Purposive sampling was used to obtain participants. A Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) questionnaire was was completed by midwives working in public and private health institutions. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential analysis. Findings: Findings from the healthcare professionals were obtained regarding the KAP and organisational factors facilitating education and training. Conclusion: The findings can be used to guide the development and implementation of the educational strategy which addresses the specific needs of the local midwives.


Quanza Mooring
Webb University, USA
Title: Student-centered teaching strategies promote positive learning outcomes in nursing education

Biography: Having been in nursing education since 2010, Dr. Mooring has worked in hospital clinical education, as well as both the community college and university setting. She is a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, where she obtained a BA in Exercise and Sport Science and minored in Spanish. She obtained her BSN from North Carolina Central University in 2008, and went on to complete a Master’s of Science in Nursing, with a concentration in nursing education from East Carolina University. Dr. Mooring earned her PhD in Education, with a focus in nursing education from Capella University in December of 2014, after completing her dissertation entitled: Aggressive Academic Advising Practices: Improving Nursing Student Persistence. She is currently the Associate Degree Program and Licensure Coordinator for Gardner-Webb University’s Hunt School of Nursing where she continues her research efforts, focusing on nursing student retention and effecting change through integrated curriculum changes and student-centered education. A wife and mother of 5 children, Dr. Mooring prides herself on juggling the rigors of personal, professional, and research responsibilities. She makes her home in Boiling Springs, NC.

Abstract: Student-centered teaching strategies promote positive learning outcomes in nursing education. The use of problem-based learning (PBL) has been effective in post-secondary education for the enhancement of critical thinking. Simulation, though comparatively new, places students in realistic patient care situations, creating a safe learning environment where mistakes are used to promote learning without the risk for patient harm. Merging PBL and simulation exposes students to critical situations and allows faculty to provide similar experiences for all students (Chan, 2013; Dehkordi & Heydarbejad, 2008; Kong et al, 2014; Mills et al, 2014; Murphy et al, 2011; Stroup, 2014; Tiwari et al, 2006). It is important for faculty to use several types of technology and creative learning experiences when developing critical thinking skills. Instructor-produced videos, online textbook resources, as well as unfolding case studies, are just a few examples of possible learning activities (Ghude, 2010; Gibbs, et al, 2014; Mills et al, 2014; Murphy et al, 2011). Coupling PBL with mid to high fidelity simulation in an unfolding case study designed to enhance prioritization and delegation skills creates an environment in which nursing fundamentals students are able to synthesize the content they’ve been taught throughout the semester, and challenges them in preparation for the more advanced nursing course that follows. Upon completion of this presentation, participants will: Understand the importance of problem based learning for the development of critical thinking in nursing education Identify strategies to incorporate technology in didactic and laboratory nursing classes Identify strategies necessary to ensure student-based learning Implementation of the 3 phase boot camp Faculty developed an activity for 1st year nursing fundamentals students. Two websites were created, dedicated to presenting patient information. Initial assessment information and a brief patient history was provided through the first website. The second site provided an update on each of the six patients, along with medications, lab values and more social history. The activity was conducted in three phases: a. Which patient to see first b. Develop a care plan c. Prioritize and delegate HCP orders Implications and potential outcomes Following this activity, students were surveyed regarding their perception of the activity. All student participants noted their satisfaction with the activity and stated their belief that critical thinking was enhanced. During the following semester, faculty met with students to identify the continued benefit in consecutive courses. Most students stated they benefited from the activity and that it helped them to critically think about nursing concepts in the medical surgical nursing course. The success of this activity implies that classroom activities should be aligned throughout didactic, laboratory, simulation and clinical experiences. Faculty should work together to ensure each course effectively prepares students for the course that follows. For example, test questions, formative and summative assessments, and activities should be presented with increasing difficulty throughout the semester, ending with assessments that are on par with what will be seen the following semester. Additionally, there should be greater collaboration amongst faculty to ensure classroom, lab, and simulation instruction works together to enhance student learning.


W.H. ten Ham-Baloyi
Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa
Title: Embracing collaboration & connectedness in nursing research: The nursing 2015 conference

Biography: Wilma ten Ham-Baloyi completed a Bachelor of Nursing degree from the Christian College of Higher Education in Ede in The Netherlands, a masters and doctorate in Community Nursing at the North-West University, Potchefstroom and an advanced diploma in the education at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. She is currently a fulltime postdoctoral fellow and part-time lecturer at the Department of Nursing Sciences at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. Her postdoctoral research project aims to develop an educational strategy for midwives with regard to clinical decision making in Kangaroo Mother Care.

Abstract: There has been an increasing demand globally for cross-institutional collaboration in research. The primary objective of collaborative research projects is to complement the expertise and strength of high quality research groups in areas of nursing thereby promoting excellence in nursing education and patient care. Numerous benefits of collaboration have been reported. These include higher impact publications, increased creativity, shared workload, constructive criticism, greater collegiate experience and increased opportunities for funding and publications. In addition to these metrics, students and post-doctoral inclusion is increased as well as a higher likelihood of having fun. The aim of this paper is to present the research collaboration that has been established between three countries Australia, Saudi Arabia and South Africa. This alliance resulted from attendance and networking at the 1st World Nursing Conference in Dubai, November 2015. The collaboration was developed based on principles of effective team building which included sharing the vision, encouraging involvement, communication, promoting feedback, developing discipline, cultivating respect and striving for balance. The first research project this international team undertook was a descriptive cross-sectional survey administered in the three countries, titled “Measuring Emotional Well-being of Nursing Students”. The presentation describes the various challenges in undertaking international collaborative research at the micro, meso, and macro-level. At the micro level the team identified a need to use country specific standards for demographic characteristics to facilitate comparison of data. At the meso level there was a need to understand the requirements for enrolments into nursing and ethical requirements for conducting research projects in each of the countries. At the macro-level, university systems and social and cultural contexts were considered. Despite the challenges, the first research project is underway. It is expected that the collaboration will continue to yield an international exchange of data and exposure to international collaboration and publications. The collaboration includes multiple benefits for all members of the team. To avoid difficulties the team recommends that possible challenges be discussed in advance which requires transparent and frequent communication between the group members.


Hongzhou Lu
Fudan University, China
Title: A qualitative study on factors associated with disclosure of parental HIV infection to children

Biography: Hongzhou, Lu is Professor at Fudan University, China, he did his Post doc from Vanderbilt University, USA

Abstract: Aim of the study/ Purpose: To investigate the factors associated with disclosure of parental HIV infection to children. Introduction in brief: The decision to disclose parental serostatus to children is complex. Reported rates of disclosure to children are low, especially in China. So we conducted a qualitative study to explore the specific reasons why not the parents with HIV infection tell their children the truth. Procedures/ Methods: An in-depth interview was conducted on 20 parents with HIV infection and data were analyzed by Colaizzi phenomenological analysis method. Results: Five barriers to disclosure of parental HIV infection to children were: stigma and worrying about their children suffering discrimination and isolation; fear of increasing children’s stress; concern about children’s negative reactions; unawareness of how to disclosure; and willingness of disclosure. Conclusion: Barriers to disclosure of parental HIV infection to children were self-perceived stigma, fear of social discrimination, and unawareness of how to disclose. Medical staff should pay attention to psychosocial needs of parents with HIV infection, and construct disclosure guidelines to alleviate their stress of disclosure. Acknowledgments The work was funded by a grant from the 12th Five-year National Plan(2012ZX09303013) to the corresponding author. We acknowledge all the parents who participated in the study.


Senay Karadag Arli
Agri Ibrahim Cecen University, Turkey
Title: Identification of nursing students’ attitudes toward older people

Biography: Senay Karadag Arli, BSc, MSc, PhD, Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at The University of Agri Ibrahim Cecen. She is an educator of surgical nursing and also interested in holistic nursing in educational and clinical areas. Ayse Berivan Bakan, BSc, MSc, PhD, Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at The University of Agri Ibrahim Cecen. She is an educator of public health nursing and also interested in holistic nursing in educational and clinical areas. Ela Erisik, BSc, MSc, is a PhD student in public health nursing. She is interested in holistic nursing in clinical area.

Abstract: Objectives: The present study aims to identify nursing students’ attitudes toward older people. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted with 166 nursing department students enrolled in a four-year undergraduate program in a university located in Eastern Turkey. The participants were chosen using convenience sampling method, and the data were collected through the Descriptive Characteristics Form and Turkish version of Kogan's Attitudes toward Old People Scale (KAOP). Results: It was found that the students participating in the study had positive attitudes toward older people, and the mean scores of those who wanted to work with older people after graduation were significantly high (p<0.05). Scale mean scores according to receiving Gerontology Nursing course showed that the score difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusions: This study found that nursing students’ attitudes toward older people were positive. Cultural features of the region where the study was conducted are considered to contribute to this result.


Latife Utas Akhan
Bülent Ecevit University, Turkey
Title: Family Burden And Quality Of Life Of Mothers Of Children And Adolescents With Intellectual Disability or Borderline

Biography: Latife UTAS AKHAN, is currntly working as an Assistant Prof.at Bulent Ecevit University Health College Head of Psychiatry Nursing Department, she was a Instructor during 2010-2012) at Bulent Ecevit University Health College, Head of Psychiatry Nursing Department İnstructor (2004-2009) at Halic University Health College, she has also worked as Psychiatry Nursing Department, Research Asistant (2003-2004) at Halic University Health College Her publications includes, : The effect of art therapy with clay on hopelessness levels among neurology patients. Rehabilitation Nursing, Doi: 10.1002/rnj.2015 (Yayın No: 1381946) (2015). The Sexual Development and Education of Preschool Children: Knowledge and Opinions from Doctors and Nurses, Sexuality And Disability, Ocak, 2015. Study Of Health Care Providers And Attitudes Against Homosexual, Bisexual Individuals.; İnternational Journal of Human Sciences vol 10(1) FEBRUARY 2013. Identification of nursing care methods intended for reducing stres caused by enviromental factors in neonates, Scientific Research and Essays, vol 6(4), 2010, she has also published Articles In National Journals: Psychopathologıcal Art and The Use Of Art In Psychıatrıc Treatment, journal of higher education and scientific, 2(2), 2012, 0-6 Age Group Of Child Care Related To The Problems Faced By Mothers Who Have Children Of Employees And The Study Of Problem Solving Approaches, Istanbul University Florence Nightingale nursing journal 19(3), 2011, Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors of University Students, Journal Of Nursing Science And Art Of Maltepe University, 3(3), 2010, she has also attended International scientific meetings and published in proceedings, Transitional Object Attachment among Kids in Nursery School and Parents Attitudes Regarding the Objects The 14th International Nursing Research Conference. 9-12 November, 2010 Burgos, Spain. Determining The Attachment Mode Of The Female Convicts And Cope With Stress. 10 National And International Congress of Nurse Students, 28-30 Aprıl 2010. Examinatıon Of the Depressıon and Desperatıon Levels In Women Undergone Hysterectomy. The 8. Annual Scientific Meeting of the European Association of Consultatıon Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomotics and the 8. Turkısh National Congress of Consultation LiaisonPsychiatry,İstanbul,2005.

Abstract: Purpose: This research aims to investigate family burden and quality of life in families who have mentally handicapped children and borderline intellectual functioning children the age between 6-16. Socio-demografic characteristics, psychological support and psychiatric medicine need in families, income support and home care support from goverment have also been evaluated in this study. Data and Methods: WISC-R test has been applied to the children of aged 6-16 to verify the diagnosis of mental handicap. Family Burden Evaluation Scale, WHOQOL-BREF and Socio- demografic form have been applied to accompanying family members. In this study, 131 children, attented to the Bülent Ecevit University Health Practise and Research Center, psychiatric department of children and adolescents, requested a mental evaluation test (WISC-R) and IQ score between 35-79 and their mothers were included. Results:The mothers who have mentally handicapped children were the age between 24-56. In those, 93.1% were married and 69.5% were lived in a nuclear family. Most of the mothers were housewife and the average montly income of the families were 1237,44±971,39 TL. In those, 25.2% were having psychological support and 26.7% were taking psychiatric medicine. Conclusion: In this study, quality of life were in mid-scale in mothers who have an mental handicapped children. The lowest score has been detected in “environmental” relation to social oppression where the highest score has been detected in “physical domain”. From the results obtain from family burden evaluation data, the most important concern of the mothers were that their mentally handicapped children would never be self-sufficient and they would fall behind from their pers.


Nursing-2017 | by: Scientific Future Group